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Impact assessment



The general framework of the impact assessment is provided by article R512-6 of the environmental code.
The content of the impact assessment must be proportional to the importance of the prescribed installation and its anticipated environmental impact with regard to the interests targeted in articles L511-1 and L211-1 of the Environmental code.

The impact assessment should successively present:

More concretely, the impact assessment should make it possible, for each major type of nuisances (water pollution, air pollution, noise, waste etc.), to establish the existing situation before starting up the installation, its characteristics and raw effects on the environment for each of these nuisances, the measures taken to reduce these effects and the expected situation after start-up. It should also provide information on the methods used to supply the installation and dispose of its products and by-products, as well as on its integration into the landscape.
If certain points do not seem to relate to the installation in question, it is necessary to succinctly explain why.
Among the measures taken, remediation measures “at source” should also be indicated, such as recycling, the choice of a non-polluting process etc.

Note: The list of points to be examined for each paragraph is not exhaustive. Furthermore, certain problems can be particularly relevant depending on the local context. In this case, more in-depth investigations will be necessary, possibly involving specialised consultancy firms (example: hydrogeological survey for quarries in relation to the groundwater table).

3Analysis of the initial condition of the site and its environment3

Different themes:

N.B.: the following are examples of elements which can be included in each theme but should under no circumstances be considered as exhaustive

Environment

Water pollution

Air pollution

Soil pollution

Noise Vibrations

Waste

Transport Supply

Risks

Subsoil

3Analysis of the direct and indirect, temporary and permanent effects of the installation on health and the environment3

Note: the following are examples of elements which can be included in each theme but should under no circumstances be considered as exhaustive

The environment

Health

The impact assessment should examine the consequences of the project on the health of the population. The method for examining this impact is applicable to all categories of classified installations, from those with low potential impact on health to those manipulating very hazardous substances. For better document clarity, we recommend that this examination mention the parts of the impact assessment dealing with all or some of the questions below. It is proportional to the health risk caused by the installation.
The approach to public health risk assessment includes in particular:

3Analysis of the origin, nature and seriousness of the nuisances likely to result from the operation of the installation3

Note: the following are examples of elements which can be included in each theme but should under no circumstances be considered as exhaustive

Water pollution

Air pollution

Soil pollution

Noise - Vibrations

Waste

Transport – Supply

3Reasons for the choice3

Note: the following are examples of elements which can be included in each theme but should under no circumstances be considered as exhaustive

Objective criteria (choices should be justified):

For large quarry sites, the possibility of evacuating materials by means other than road, such as railway, should be envisaged.

3Measures envisaged to eliminate, limit and, if possible, compensate for the nuisances of the installation3

Note: the following are examples of elements which can be included in each theme but should under no circumstances be considered as exhaustive

Environment

Water pollution.

Air pollution – Rational use of energy

Soil pollution

Noise Vibrations

Waste

Transport - Supply

Soil

3Site rehabilitation conditions3

Note: the following are examples of elements which can be included in each theme but should under no circumstances be considered as exhaustive

Since 23 March 2000, the description of rehabilitation conditions after operation has been extended to all classified installations. This section should be adapted according to the type of installation (quarry, waste storage or other installation).

Operating method

Rehabilitation

Final condition